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Fiction by Kerouac

 


Kerouac, Jack and William S. Burrough. And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks. New York: Grove Press, 2008.

 

William S. Burroughs and Jack Kerouac collaborated on a novel about bohemian life in New York during World War II. Published after more than 60 years, the book is a window into the lives of 2 of the 20th century’s most influential writers.

 


Kerouac, Jack. Atop an Underwood: Early Stories and Other Writings. Paul Marion, ed. New York: Viking, 1999.

 

This collection of early prose, poetry, and fictional explores a part of the writer’s literary development that had never before been published and available.

 

 

Kerouac, Jack. Big Sur. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.

 

Jack Kerouac confronts his alcoholism as a genuine problem in this work which continues his autobiographical adventures as the wanderer from On the Road. Written 1961; originally published 1962.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Desolation Angels. New York: Riverhead Books, 1995.

 

Written over a period of years, this novel is considered the definitive voice of the Beat Generation. It is the story of Kerouac's life as told through Jack Duluoz, his fictional self, as he hitchhikes, walks, and talks his way around the world. Written 1956-1961; originally published 1965.

 

Kerouac, Jack. The Dharma Bums. Viking, 2008.

 

This novel of the Beat Generation, published a year after On the Road, demonstrates the author's humor and zest for life. Written 1957; originally published 1958.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Doctor Sax and the Great World Snake. New York: Gallery Six, 2003.

 

A previously unpublished screenplay adaptation of the mystical vision-novel Doctor Sax. This haunting tale is based on Kerouac’s childhood in the industrial town of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1930s.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Doctor Sax: Faust Part Three. New York: Grove Press, 1987.

 

Dr. Sax is a shadow-like creation that haunts the adolescent fantasy world of Jack and his friends as they grow up in the mid-1930s in Lowell, Massachusetts. Written 1952; originally published 1959.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Lonesome Traveler. New York: Grove Press, 1960.

 

This is Kerouac's first truly autobiographical novel written in his characteristic page-long sentences and jazz-like prose. He tells the story of his restless years of wandering while he was writing the books that captivated and infuriated the public.Written and originally published 1960.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Maggie Cassidy. New York: Penguin Books, 1959.

 

Written earlier than On the Road, this novel was only recognized after Kerouac's “overnight success.” It recounts Kerouac's first love with his high school sweetheart in the late 1930s. Originally titled Springtime Mary. Written 1953; originally published 1959.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road. New York: Signet Books, 1957.

 

This classic novel has had a profound impact on three generations of writers, artists, musicians, and poets. “Sal Paradise” (Jack Kerouac) and “Dean Moriarity” (Neal Cassady) seek self-knowledge as well as sex, drugs, and adventure on the open road. Written 1951; originally published 1957.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road. New York: Penguin Books, 2003.

 

This classic novel has had a profound impact on three generations of writers, artists, musicians, and poets. “Sal Paradise” (Kerouac) and “Dean Moriarity” (Cassady) seek self-knowledge as well as sex, drugs, and adventure on the open road. Written 1951; originally published 1957.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road. New York: Viking, 2007.

 

This classic novel has had a profound impact on three generations of writers, artists, musicians, and poets. “Sal Paradise” (Kerouac) and “Dean Moriarity” (Cassady) seek self-knowledge as well as sex, drugs, and adventure on the open road. Written 1951; originally published 1957.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road. New York: Penguin Books, 2011.

 

This classic novel has had a profound impact on three generations of writers, artists, musicians, and poets. “Sal Paradise” (Kerouac) and “Dean Moriarity” (Cassady) seek self-knowledge as well as sex, drugs, and adventure on the open road. Written 1951; originally published 1957.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road. New York: Penguin Books, 2016.

 

This classic novel has had a profound impact on three generations of writers, artists, musicians, and poets. “Sal Paradise” (Kerouac) and “Dean Moriarity” (Cassady) seek self-knowledge as well as sex, drugs, and adventure on the open road. Written 1951; originally published 1957.

 

Kerouac, Jack. On the Road: The Original Scroll. New York: Viking, 2007.

 

A reproduction of Kerouac's original 1951 scroll draft of On the Road offers insight into the writer's thematic vision and narrative voice.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Orpheus Emerged. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002.

 

Discovered by his estate following Kerouac's death in 1969, this novel explores the dreams, conflicts, and passions of a group of bohemian students while studying at a university.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Road Novels 1957-1960. New York: Library of America, 2007.

 

A collector's edition combines the eminent On the Road with the novels The Dharma Bums, The Subterraneans, Tristessa, and Lonesome Traveler.

 

 

Kerouac, Jack. Satori in Paris & Pic. New York: Grove Press, 1988.

 

Kerouac's final last two novels. Satori is an autobiographical account of Kerouac’s search for his heritage in France. Pic follows the adventures of two brothers as they travel from the South to Harlem in the 1940s.

 


Kerouac, Jack. The Sea is My Brother. Boston: De Capo Press, 2012.

 

Kerouac began this work not long after his first tour as a Merchant Marine on the S.S. Dorchester in the late summer of 1942 during which he kept a journal detailing the gritty daily routine of life at sea.

 

 

Kerouac, Jack. The Subterraneans. New York: Grove Press, 1958.

 

Written over the course of three days and three nights, Kerouac chronicles his brief love affair with Mardou Fox, a young black woman. Written 1953; originally published 1958.

 

Kerouac, Jack. The Town and the City. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1983.

 

This is Jack Kerouac's first novel. Written in a traditional style, it is the story of his family from the early 1900s to the years following World War II. Written 1946-1948; originally published 1950.

 

 

Kerouac, Jack. Tristessa. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.

 

The portrait of a young prostitute with whom Kerouac had an affair amidst the squalor of the drug underworld of Mexico City. Written 1955-1956; originally published 1960.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Vanity of Duluoz: An Adventurous Education, 1935-46. New York: Penguin Books, 1994.

 

Recollections of Kerouac's life from his high school football years to his time on a merchant freighter during World War II. Written 1968; originally published 1968.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Visions of Cody. New York: Penguin Books, 1993.

 

This work of spontaneous prose became an underground legend. In one excerpt Kerouac transcribes an audiotape made with Neal Cassady over several days in his Nob Hill, San Francisco kitchen. Written 1951-1952; originally published 1972.

 

Kerouac, Jack. Visions of Gerard. New York: Penguin Books, 1963, 1991.

 

Kerouac focuses on his early childhood and the emotions he felt after his older brother’s tragic death from rheumatic fever at the age of nine. Written in 1951-1952; originally published 1958.

 

 

Related Fiction

 

 

 

Holmes, John Clellon. Go: A Novel. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, 1988.

 

Published five years before On the Road, Go is generally acknowledged as the first Beat novel depicting the underground counterculture that questioned the complacency of the 1950s.

 

Kerouac, Jan. Baby Driver. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1981.

 

Following in her father's footsteps, Jan Kerouac offers a view of the generation that followed her father's Beat Generation. She takes us through her own version of the psychedelic 1960s.This is Jan Kerouac's first book.

 

Kerouac, Jan. Trainsong. New York: Henry Holt, 1988.

 

Jan travels across the globe searching for her identity. Behind all of her restlessness lies the ghost of Jack Kerouac, the father she never knew. An interesting look into a child's heart as she searches for her father and herself.

 

 

 

 

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